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Liability-Coverages

An insured is renting a banquet facility for his daughter’s college graduation party. The facility wants to be an additional insured on their liability coverage and a certificate of insurance to prove it. A friend of the daughter is providing valet parking service. And, of course, there will be alcohol served. Are there any insurance issues?
What happens if an insured’s tree falls and damages property or injures someone on a neighbor’s premises? If the occurrence is caused by an “Act of God,” is the insured off the hook? This may not be as simple a question as you think and many factors can come into play.
From our “Ask an Expert” files: “I have a question about some of the insurance exposures that arise when people host parties – especially during the Holidays. One of the main issues I am concerned about is how the homeowners policy of the host (our insured) would respond to claims where a guest drinks too much and later causes an auto accident. Would their homeowners policy cover them? Also, I’d appreciate any additional comments on other social-host exposures.”
A guest leaves your party where they consumed too much alcohol, has an accident, and you’re sued. Is this an HO or PAP exposure, or both? If it’s a PAP exposure, does it matter that neither you, a family member, nor a vehicle you own was involved in the accident? Apparently opinions vary.
More than one-third of homeowners’ insurance liability claims are attributable to dog bites according to a 2016 Insurance Information Institute (III) report. III reported that the average cost of a dog-bite claim in 2015 was $37,214 - a 94 percent increase since 2003.
You hook a shot off the tee. After a glancing blow to the head of a prominent local attorney, the ball hits a passing car driven by a 'golf widow' on a public road, then bounces through the window of the home of a municipal judge next to the fairway. Surprise...lawsuits are filed! Are you liable? Is the course liable? The answers may surprise you.
Your insured is boarding a horse at a neighbor's property. You want to make sure that your insured has liability coverage in case the horse injures someone or damages property. Does the ISO HO3 policy afford this coverage without endorsement? If not, what can you do?
Your daughter is getting married and friends with a beautiful lake home have offered their place for the reception. Concerned about personal liability, you check your HO policy but the definition of 'insured location' only really includes premises where you reside, are building a residence, are vacant, or are renting temporarily. Your friend is not charging anything. Do you have any coverage?
It’s as certain as the hunting seasons: When the seasons begin, hunters ask their insurance agents about liability coverage on owned and leased hunting land, and landowners ask about liability insurance on property leased to hunters. Is this a Homeowners or a CGL exposure? Well, it depends....
The definition of 'insured location' under the ISO homeowner policies includes 'Land owned by or rented to an 'insured' on which a one, two, three or four family dwelling is being built as a residence for an insured.' Does the liability coverage extend to the land only, or does it include liability INSIDE the home that is being built?
Your insured hosts a New Years Eve party and one inebriated guest negligently causes a serious auto accident on the way home. Your insured is sued. Will his homeowners or auto policies respond? Well, the answer may depend on the edition dates...it's possible that both, either or neither will respond.
While 'expert' sites are proliferating on the net, it pays to get advice from real subject experts. Below is a question and answer provided at a well-known consumer insurance web site. Compare their response to the question to that of some of our faculty.