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Miscellaneous

A homeowner’s two boats were damaged when a barn they were stored in collapsed due to snow accumulation. The adjuster has refused to pay for the cost to protect the boats from the weather and also the cost to replace the carpeting in each boat which is full of glass splinters. Do you agree?
Need help finding the condominium laws of each state? This reference gives you the condominium law, the horizontal property law, the common ownership law, or whatever it is called of every state. Useful – and needed - whether you insure the association or the unit owner.
The client calls and tells you they have sold or traded in their car. Do you delete coverage that day? Be careful. What about if the insureds have sold their home? When is it proper to delete coverage?
Liability policies, whether the HO, PAP or CGL, respond when the insured is judged to be “legally liable” for the injury or damage. But how is “legal liability” determined? That is the question answered in this short article.
Insurance (or assurance), as we understand the concept today, is more than 700 years old. But what events shaped our modern world of insurance? Following are some interesting facts, myths, and legends that helped mold the current insurance world in America.
This may be the most important coverage article you read this year. It may be the most important coverage article you’ve ever read. Please read it. And please have your colleagues read it. If you work in an agency, send a link to the article to your underwriters, marketing reps, and claims people. RTFA…Read The Article!
Ownership, or rather the desire to own, is changing. More and more people see less and less the need to own something they don’t use on a regular basis. As the saying goes, “I don’t need a drill, I just need a hole.” The insurance industry needs to prepare for this shift in attitude and desire.
Most people, including your clients, are insurance illiterates. Their limited understanding of insurance comes from the commercials they see on TV and the misinformation they “hear on the streets.” Insurance professionals should invest in their client’s kids. Why? Let us count the ways.
There's an expression that says, 'There's more than one way to skin a cat.' In a manner of speaking, that's another way to describe the risk management process. As you'll see below, insurance isn't the only tool you have when helping your insureds manage risk.
Since many homeowners policies do not cover animal liability (or in the case of ISO, canine liability), it begs the question of how personal umbrella and excess liability policies respond for dog bites and other animal liability claims. For insureds with an animal exposure, an umbrella policy may be critical.
Insurance fraud is not new, but it is a growing industry-wide problem. But from an agent’s point of view, one might ask, “What is an agent’s role in detecting possible insurance fraud?” After all, the insurance process starts with the agent who collects information about what is being insured. Until verified or proven otherwise, the agent more or less assumes that the information provided by the applicant is accurate, complete, and reliable. Jewelry insurance: under-appreciated but highly susceptible to fraud.
In many states, it has become extremely difficult to find a viable homeowners market. In most states, even where markets are relatively abundant, the hard market has played havoc with premiums, resulting in affordability problems for many insureds. However, there are some simple things you and your clients can do to improve the situation. Why we haven't done them before is one of the great historical mysteries of insurance.
In Part 1 of this article, we explored the premise that homeowners coverages are generally too broad and deductibles are too low. In this part, we'll take a look at the exposure from a risk management perspective. Included is a simple, downloadable checklist that you and/or your insureds can use on a regular basis for loss prevention.
It's been almost 15 years since ISO made major changes in their Dwelling Fire Program. In the 1980's, ISO revised the DP program to track better with their HO program, but there were still some major coverage differences (see companion article). While there are still differences, the 2002 DP program narrows those differences somewhat.
Homeowner carriers often have restrictions and capacity limitations for jewelry. Many carriers are not willing to write higher-value jewelry. It can be difficult to find a policy that adequately covers jewelry and also offers the client a competitive price. A stand-alone jewelry policy (personal articles floater—PAF) addresses the jewelry need without impacting the homeowners policy.
In the 1980's and 2000s, ISO made major revisions in their Dwelling Fire and Homeowners programs. Overall, these changes made these programs more similar to each other. However, there are still major differences between the two programs. This article provides a list of the significant differences between DP and HO policies.
When was the last time you surveyed your personal lines accounts and asked if business was being conducted, either full or part time, from home? According to research, at least 20-40% of all homes have some kind of business activity. Failure to identify and counsel your personal lines clients can be catastrophic...both for them and you.
Perhaps the best bargain in insurance is an umbrella policy. However, convincing your customers of the need and value of an umbrella policy is another matter. This article presents the views of the VU faculty on why your customers need an umbrella.